Category Archives: Thriving

One final entry …

This will be the final entry in this blog. As regular readers know, Mrs. R. and I have spent a good deal of time in the hands of the medical profession in the five months since Thanksgiving. She has had a number of issues, including three operations. She faces nothing life threatening, other than the […]

Change: Arnie Goes High Tech

From The Arnie Chronicles, the semi-fictional biography of Joshua Bateman Arnold. For those of you who are relatively new to this blog, I must introduce Arnie — Joshua Bateman Arnold, about whom I haven’t written since last November.   He is my neighbor and a retired long haul trucker. He’s also a widower, and Mrs. R. […]

It’s Never Too Late: The Short Happy Career of Willie Wood

At long last he putted, and the ball rolled agonizingly slowly across the green, then broke right towards the cup. “Go!” I shouted. “Go!” THIS IS THE STORY of a professional athlete and one of his more ardent fans. The athlete is former PGA touring pro Willie Wood.   I am the fan. I became aware […]

Aging: ‘Dying Young Only Looks Good in the Movies’

Journalist Regina Brett put it all in perspective. When she turned fifty, she wrote, “After having breast cancer at forty-one, I’m thrilled to grow old.” BACK IN THE EARLY 1960’S, before Mrs. R. and I were married, we were both employed at a large defense-oriented research firm in Northern California. The staff was a well-educated […]

Health: The Pet As Therapist

“[One] study found that nursing home residents felt much less lonely after spending time alone with a dog than when other people joined in the visit.” by Dave Riley MRS. R. AND I LIVE in what can fairly be called a very large retirement community — 17,000 people. But at times it seems like there […]

Compassion: People Who Gave … and Gave

by Dave Riley When you write about people — good people, that is — you don’t choose just anyone for a subject. You look for those who are somehow special, somehow more compassionate. As a result you can easily develop an attachment to them, as if each one were a close friend. When I wrote […]

Aging: Arnie, Soledad Mexia and the Fountain of Youth

The latest episode in the semi-fictional biography of Joshua Bateman Arnold.  by Dave Riley IT WAS A LAZY SATURDAY MORNING, and, as we frequently do, Mrs. R. and I, along with our neighbor Arnie, who has been enjoying an extended vacation from this blog, were sitting in the backyard reading. Mrs. R. was perusing a […]

When We Were Kids: My First Employer

Once I said to Joe, who questioned some work I had done, “I think it’s good enough.” Joe, with a withering glare I shall never forget, replied, “Good enough, isn’t.” by Dave Riley Kids’ activities don’t run on autopilot. There have to be adults who coach and manage and make sure that stuff gets organized. […]

Aging: Besse Cooper’s 42,000 Sunrises

“Naming bridges is no slam dunk in Georgia. For a while it appeared the state legislature would have to sign off on it, which couldn’t happen until after the bridge was dedicated.” THIS IS A STORY ABOUT A BRIDGE, a county in Georgia with a famous resident, and a great great grandmother— the latter mainly […]

Our National Electoral Food Fight

“It was a Trump-free week, a week without Hillary and Bernie, a week during which we didn’t have to put up with a Democrat on one side and a Republican on the other making evasive answers and generally telling fibs about the other.” by Dave Riley  I HAVE NEVER RUN FOR OFFICE, although I have […]